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Mirtel Manor Farm​    NPIP#31-1283

♥Our number one priority is our animals quality of life♥

♥Save the Spanish big or small save them all♥

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Helpful Hatching Tips

• Have your incubator up and running in good working order well in advance of any egg delivery date. You will need a minimum of seventy-two hours of optimum running to assure that the incubator is operating at the correct temperature settings.  I have included a very helpful link at the bottom of the page from Brinsea on everything you need to know on incubation.

• At home unpack the eggs, candle them for fine cracks, and then let them stand for twenty-four hours to allow the air cell to reposition if it has been moved out of position fat end up in an egg carton.  Please avoid letting your eggs sit in extreme heat or cold.

• Shipped eggs can have a lot lower hatch rate since you don’t know how rough of a journey they had getting to you.  Your shipper will do their best to package the eggs in a way that will reduce breakage but if your eggs are handled rough and experience significant temperature changes, not to mention the possibility of being X-rayed, you may have a lower hatch rate. Shipped eggs are a gamble that you should be willing to take before purchasing them. 

• It is approximately 21 days for most breeds of chickens. Some birds have longer or shorter hatching times. Seramas are a small bantam breed and generally hatch a little early. The following are typical incubation periods for each bird, plus the optimal temperature and humidity. These are the typical recommendations, you may find for your area of the country and particular breed that you may need to make adjustments to these recommendations.

• It is approximately 21 days for most breeds of chickens. Some birds have longer or shorter hatching times. Seramas are a small bantam breed and generally hatch a little early. The following are typical incubation periods for each bird, plus the optimal temperature and humidity. These are the typical recommendations, you may find for your area of the country and particular breed that you may need to make adjustments to these recommendations.

  Temperature should be kept at 99.5 degrees and humidity between 40-50% for the first 18 days.  Humidity then should be bumped up to 55-65% during the last 3 days of incubation also known as "lock-down".  During lock-down it is VERY important not to open the incubator.  I know it is very hard to be hands off during this time but I can promise you will ruin a perfectly good hatch.  When the chicks start to hatch they are fine to be left in the incubator as they have enough nutrients from the yolk to last up to 2 days.


Brinsea Incubation Handbook Link